MV Financial Blog

Posts published in July 2013

MV Weekly Market Flash: The Vanishing Act of Low Correlations

July 25, 2013

By Masood Vojdani & Katrina Lamb, CFA

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Hedge funds are back in the news this week. The latest Master of the Universe to be scorched by the sun and come crashing back to earth is Steven Cohen. Cohen, the sole proprietor of $15 billion hedge funds SAC, is in the crosshairs of a major insider trading scandal that has already taken down many of his closest colleagues. It seems that years of 30%-plus returns required a little extra “sauce” – yet another reminder to those who believe in free lunches and tooth fairies that if something looks too good to be true, it probably is. But while the humbled rogues are the ones who make the headlines, some real problems affect a much broader swath of hedge funds and indeed other asset classes that have long styled themselves as “alternatives” – as offering a refuge from the traditional world of stocks and bonds.

Liquidity: A Blessing and a Curse

We normally think of liquidity as a good thing. Liquid markets make it easier to buy and sell assets with confidence that the price you see is the price you get. But at the same time, the liquidity that comes from easier access – which has happened successively with historically low-correlation assets like commodities, REITs and now hedge strategies – makes it more likely that those assets will correlate more closely to traditional stocks and bonds.

Think of it this way: commodities used to be accessible only to investors with the means and the knowledge to invest directly in futures contracts – a small number of souls indeed. Now anyone with $500 can purchase a commodities ETF on eTrade. Hedge funds, too, have moved into the world of regulated mutual funds. That’s good for enabling more investors to build diversified portfolios: the catch is that those diversification benefits diminish when assets trade more on whether or not Ben Bernanke says “tapering” and less on the fundamental merits of individual assets or business cycle considerations.

More Fishermen, Fewer Fish

You can see this effect in the numbers. Over the last five years the correlation between the HFRI Fund of Funds Index and the S&P 500 has been 0.76 (where 1.0 represents perfect positive correlation). By contrast this value was 0.32 in the five years from 1991 to 1996. Even more strikingly, the correlation between the Dow UBS Commodity index and the S&P 500 was 0.02 in the 1991-96 period – basically implying no correlation at all – and had shot up to 0.81 by 2008-13. It is not a mere coincidence that the first ETF launched in 1993 and has since grown to a market worth nearly $1.5 trillion in total assets.

This makes it harder for intrepid money managers to discover untapped nooks and crannies in the global capital markets. It’s like a pond teeming with fish: a few folks stumble upon it, cast their lines and hook one fish after another. Then word gets out, the hordes descend and the fish disappear. The money managers find it increasingly hard to prove their prowess in delivering alpha. Some – like SAC – turn to more desperate measures to create the illusion of success, and fall hard when their luck runs out.

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MV Weekly Market Flash: Equities Fever

July 18, 2013

By Masood Vojdani & Katrina Lamb, CFA

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Sentiment in risk asset markets has taken a sharp turn for the better in 2013 year to date, and the bulls are making a rather compelling case that the good times may roll on for awhile yet. The S&P 500 surged to yet another record level on a jetstream-strength tailwind of $19.7 billion of net new assets poured into global equity funds. That’s the most since June 2008, as good a sign as any that the fear-greed pendulum has well and truly crossed the full horizon. That being said, the funds flow has been unusually concentrated. Of that $19.7 billion a full $17.5 billion went into US funds, and $6.5 billion into one single asset – the SPDR S&P 500 exchange traded fund (SPY). No wonder the S&P 500 is proving to be such a formidable benchmark for active money managers to beat this year.

Bye Bye Bonds

The gains in equities have come at the expense of bond funds, which saw $700 million of net outflows. Most of the outflows relate to rate-sensitive areas like US governments and investment grade corporates, along with emerging markets funds, while high yield funds saw sizable net inflows. That is not altogether surprising, as high yield bonds often exhibit trading patterns closer to equities than to other bond asset classes. This week’s bond exodus didn’t do much to move the needle on broad market yields, though. In fact the 10 year yield has generally trended downwards over the week, staying just below 2.5% as Friday trading approached the close.

Banks Rock, Techs Lag

With around 25% of the S&P 500 companies reporting on 2Q performance thus far the picture is a bit more mixed than the general euphoria of weekly funds flows. Financials are leading the way and tech, laden down by Apple, is bringing up the rear. The financial sector overall is showing earnings growth of 24.3%, highest overall for the second quarter in a row. In fact when you take financials out of the equation the blended earnings growth rate for the S&P 500 overall falls from 1.1% to -3.5%. Big names like Citigroup, JP Morgan and Bank of America have provided much of the strength, and interestingly the consumer finance subsector is the strongest overall. Rock on, US credit card users.

Apple as Albatross

If giant banks are a blessing to the financial sector, one behemoth is proving to be a curse on the tech sector. That would be Apple, the largest company by market cap on the S&P 500. Earnings growth for S&P technology companies is -9.4% based on current consensus expectations, but if you take Apple out of the equation that jumps to only -6.9%. Perhaps most ominously, sales of iPads are projected to fall 14% over the next year. The iPad Mini is experiencing some stiff competition in that space from Amazon’s Kindle, among other factors. Proving yet again that when it comes to tech, yesterday’s darlings can find it challenging to sustain the high expectations that come with being #1.

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MV Weekly Market Flash: Bernanke to Market: Party On

July 11, 2013

By Masood Vojdani & Katrina Lamb, CFA

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The phrase “BlackBerry Panic” gained currency back in the dark days of 2008. It was a wry, very apt touchstone for how policymakers kept one nervous eye on the flashing screens of their smartphones while trying to figure out how to save the financial world from ruin. Well, it’s 2013 now. BlackBerries are well on their way to becoming quaint relics of a time gone by, and financial Armageddon is not looming directly overhead. But whether from a high resolution iPad 4 or a sleek Samsung Galaxy, the daily upticks and downticks of asset prices continue to jump out of cyberspace and into the attention spans of Ben Bernanke and his Board of Governors colleagues.

English Lessons

After the sharp run-up in bond yields and a (relatively minor) correction in US equities, Bernanke used his microphone time this week to belabor the point that there is no definition of “tapering” in the dictionary that equates to “imminent rate hike”. Markets got the point. The S&P 500 clawed back all of its June losses and then some, closing out July 11 at 1672. The 10-year Treasury yield fell back below 2.6%, and the VIX Volatility index – Wall Street’s “fear gauge” – crawled meekly back below 13 after surpassing 22 in late June. So the gods are in Valhalla and all’s right with the world?

Beware the Net Outflows

Not necessarily. It’s perfectly understandable why Bernanke wants to jawbone markets, particularly bond yields. The surge from 1.6% to 2.7% on the 10 year note was overblown and not justified by credit market fundamentals. But investor behavior is not rational, and an outcome of selling begetting more selling could inflict real damage on business decisions around hiring, capital investment and the like. Hence Bernanke’s deliberate spelling out the difference between tapering and an actual change in interest rate policy.

Kick the Habit…But Not Yet

But the subtext to this is that once again the policy goalposts are susceptible to being moved. Since the announcement of QE3 last year the oft-quoted benchmark for economic improvement was an unemployment rate of 6.5%. Now some of the more dovish Fed governors are floating 6.0%, or maybe something else instead. “We’ll know it when we see it”, one supposes the governors to be saying to each other in their private conversations. Meanwhile, keep the punchbowl spiked so that assets don’t do something crazy like go off and respond to actual, real supply and demand dynamics.

Waiting for Capitalism

Amid the nervous chatter in the past several weeks there have been not a small number of voices expressing pleasure in the expectation that these real-world fundamentals might be on the horizon again. Sure, there might be a few months or more of unpleasant adjustment, but then the patient will be able to stand on its own two feet again. Credit markets can reflect the equilibrium between borrowers and savers without the Great Nanny hovering overhead with $85 billion worth of monthly injections. We’re not there yet. When Ben Bernanke switches off his smartphone and sits down to make policy without wondering where the Dow’s at, or how much net outflow took place in bond mutual funds this week, then we’ll be a bit closer to letting capital markets do what they do best – to discover their own prices and values.

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